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  • Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Initiating a Diabetes Management Program for Underserved Populations Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $138,531

    Jamaica Hospital Medical Center (JHMC) and Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) sites serve patients who are predominantly African American, Hispanic, and Asian and disproportionately affected by diabetes. These sites are located in neighborhoods that have higher-than-average mortality rates for diabetes—40.9 per 100,000, compared to 23.3 in all of New York City and 20.5 in New York State. In 2008, NYSHealth awarded JHMC  a grant to develop a partnership with FHMC to address these disparities among its client base by implementing the Chronic Care Model (CCM) at its facilities. NYSHealth funded this project through its 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals.

  • Family Health Network of Central New York, Inc. Expanding the Chronic Care Model for Patients with Diabetes in Central New York Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $250,912

    According to the Family Health Network of Central New York (FHN), a multisite, federally qualified health center in Cortland County, more people with diabetes in Cortland County die of complications related to diabetes than in other parts of the State. This region of the State also has the third-lowest reported daily self-monitoring of blood glucose and the fifth-lowest reported daily foot self-check among members of the New York Diabetes Coalition. In January 2008, NYSHealth awarded FHN a grant to expand its existing diabetes program that was launched in 2006 to include more care teams and locations in Cortland County. NYSHealth funded this project through its 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals.

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center Diabetes Management Initiative Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $214,210

    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center (MLK) serves a predominantly vulnerable population of more than 668,300 people in the central and south Bronx. Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions among these residents, with 11% to 17% of adults reporting having diabetes—a rate that is significantly higher than the overall New York City rate of 9% and the national goal of under 2.5%. Uncontrolled diabetes contributes to a number of health complications: increased risk for heart disease and stroke, end-stage renal disease, blindness, and amputations. In January 2008, NYSHealth awarded MLK a grant to standardize diabetes care across its ambulatory care clinics’ internal and family medicine departments, integrate community health workers (CHWs) into its treatment plan for patients with diabetes, and reduce diabetes-related complications. NYSHealth funded this project through its 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals.

  • Charles B. Wang Community Health Center Chinatown Diabetes ACTION (Accelerating Collaboration To Improve Health Outcomes Now) Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $230,000

    Diabetes is a growing epidemic. In New York, the prevalence rate is higher in Asian communities, particularly among adults born in South Asia. With proper management, diabetes can be controlled; however, medically underserved and disadvantaged groups, such as Asian Americans, often have difficulty managing the disease. With support from NYSHealth, Charles B. Wang Community Health Center (CBW) formed the Chinatown Diabetes Accelerating Collaboration to Improve Health Outcomes Now (ACTION) to further improve its care for its patients with diabetes. This initiative has allowed CBW to build a foundation for continued sustainability of diabetes management activities. This project was funded under NYSHealth’s 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals.

  • Beth Israel Medical Center, Friedman Diabetes Institute Queens South Asian Action for Diabetes Education Programs and Treatment (ADEPT) Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $245,861

    South Asians have the highest rate of Type 2 diabetes among ethnic groups in New York City. More than 210,000 South Asians live in New York City—primarily in Queens. In this community, immigration status, lack of health insurance, mistrust of the health care system, and language and/or cultural barriers all hinder optimal diabetes control. Thus, with support from NYSHealth, Beth Israel Medical Center’s Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute met with key stakeholders in the South Asian community to discuss culturally and linguistically appropriate health interventions for people with diabetes. As a result, a dynamic model of diabetes prevention and disease management—the Queens/South Asian Action for Diabetes Education Programs and Treatment (ADEPT)—was established. This project was funded under NYSHealth’s 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals. 

  • Seton Health System DEFY DIABETES! Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $562,544

    Seton Health is part of Ascension Health system, which serves a large swath of poverty-stricken areas in northeastern New York characterized by higher-than-average levels of poverty, vacant housing, and female-led households, and low levels of education. Diabetes disproportionately affects low-income populations, which have much higher rates of diabetes-related complications and mortality. In 2008, NYSHealth awarded Seton Health a grant to use an established parish community nurse model and its outpatient diabetes education program to create its Defy Diabetes initiative and address the needs of people with diabetes. NYSHealth funded this project through its 2007 Setting the Standard: Advancing Best Practices in Diabetes Management request for proposals.

  • National Urban Fellows, Inc. Internship of the National Urban Fellows, Class of 2008 Priority Area: Other $67,000

    To maximize each fellow’s talents while also providing a rich learning experience, NYSHealth assigns concrete projects and goals to allow fellows to focus their time and energy. Connecting the fellow’s interests and existing skill set with opportunities to grow, expand, and attain new competencies makes for a fulfilling experience for the fellow as well as for the mentoring organization.

  • Hunter College (CUNY) CUNY Campaign Against Diabetes Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $300,000

    Unhealthy employees are a major cost to employers. Employers can benefit from investing in the prevention and treatment and are often times the most equipped to control and prevent diabetes. The CUNY Campaign Against Diabetes sought to reduce the incidence of uncontrolled diabetes in CUNY students, faculty, staff, and their family members through the implementation of a work-based diabetes prevention, management and wellness initiative.

  • University of Rochester - Environmental Health Sciences Center Building Local Coalitions to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $139,770

    Childhood lead poisoning rates have decreased in the past several decades, but the rates in upstate New York remain among the highest in the country, particularly among low-income children living in older housing. To address the high risk of childhood lead poisoning in upstate counties, diverse stakeholders in Rochester formed the community-based Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning (CPLP). In 2005, as a result of the Coalition’s efforts, Rochester passed the first local lead law in New York State (outside of New York City), which required inspections for lead paint hazards as part of Rochester’s existing housing inspection process for rental housing.

  • The What to Expect Foundation Baby Basics: Prenatal Health Literacy Program at MIC Women's Health Centers Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $299,919

    The United States infant mortality rate is higher than that of 29 other nations, and more than 40 million adults have limited literacy skills. Many at-risk women do not receive comprehensive, coordinated care and health literacy education that would lead to healthier pregnancies and to building skills that would assist them in advocating for their own and their family’s health. Under this grant, the What to Expect Foundation (WTEF) collaborated with Public Health Solutions (PHS) to roll out its pilot-tested Baby Basics Program to low-income, low-literacy expectant and new mothers seeking prenatal and postpartum care at several New York City maternal and child health clinics run by PHS (MIC-Women’s Health Services sites). The Baby Basics Program provides health literacy tools, training, and technical assistance to everyone who works with a pregnant woman, from the receptionist, to the doctor, to the home visitor—so they can better communicate and educate underserved, expecting women. During the course of the grant, more than 5,000 mothers were reached through the five MIC sites and the home visiting programs, exceeding its expected outcomes.

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