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  • Foundation for Long Term Care Research to Practice: Long Term Care Charge Nurse Peer Mentoring Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $160,182

    There are a variety of issues facing long-term care nursing facilities. First, there is a severe shortage of long-term care registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) in New York State. According to a 2006 report by LeadingAge New York, about 65% of New York nursing homes reported having unfilled RN and LPN positions. In addition, nursing programs rarely train students in management. Yet when RNs or LPNs start working in long-term care settings, they are thrust into management and leadership positions as charge nurses, leading to difficulties in these roles and a resulting high turnover rate. In September 2007, the New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth) awarded the Foundation for Long Term Care (FLTC) a grant to expand across New York State the Pathways to Leadership program, a leadership, management, and communications training program aimed at reducing turnover of charge nurses.

  • American Cancer Society Expanded Access to Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Rural Populations in Upstate New York Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $23,630

    Residents of rural regions exhibit higher colorectal cancer mortality rates and are less likely to receive routine colorectal cancer screening than urban residents. Three New York State counties—Cortland, Delaware, and Steuben— were selected for a targeted mail intervention approach because of their rurality, colorectal cancer mortality, and high percentages of late-stage diagnosis. The American Cancer Society developed this intervention to increase enrollment of uninsured and underinsured rural residents, ages 50 to 64 and in need of colorectal cancer screening, into the New York State Cancer Services Program. In addition, they hoped for program-eligible rural residents to begin or to increase their use of home-based colorectal cancer screening tests when made aware of the program.

  • Adirondack Medical Center Northern Adirondack Health Exchange Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $138,700

    To improve health care on an individual and community level, Health Information Technology (HIT) systems were fine-tuned for the northern Adirondack Region. Specifically, a health exchange was established for Trudeau Health Systems and Adirondack Medical Center, with support from NYSHealth. This communitywide electronic medical record (EMR) integration enabled these providers to create a comprehensive health record for patients across all of their organizations in this rural region—shared records where multiple service area providers could access pre-selected, pertinent patient health information, add information, and use the EMR to treat patients. Thus, the Health Exchange has allowed area health care providers to view and update shared patients’ medical records, allowing for more efficient patient care.

  • Institute for Family Health Access to Primary Care for the Underserved in the Mid-Hudson Valley Priority Area: Special Projects Fund Priority Area: Advancing Primary Care $1,056,453

    Until 2007, the Mid-Hudson Family Health Institute owned and operated six family practice centers in Ulster and Dutchess Counties. These centers were the major source of primary and preventive care in New Paltz, Kingston, Ellenville, and Hyde Park. By 2007, the Mid-Hudson network was experiencing mounting financial losses and was on the brink of insolvency. The collapse of the network would create a huge void in area residents’ access to health care. Consequently, Mid-Hudson asked the Institute for Family Health (d/b/a Institute for Urban Family Health at the time) to step in and assume its operations. By January 2007, the Institute had obtained approval from the Federal Bureau of Primary Care and the New York State Department of Health to acquire the Mid-Hudson sites and include them in their Federal scope of service, transforming the centers into FQHCs and operating them on the Institute’s Article 28 license.

  • Ibero-American Action League, Inc. Promotores de Salud Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $150,000

    There are significant differences in the causes of mortality and in access to health care between Latinos and the broader population of Rochester, New York that reflect inadequate access to health care services, as well as a failure to use existing community services. Latino patients being treated and released at hospital emergency departments for illnesses or complaints that could otherwise be treated in an outpatient setting is an indicator of the lack of a “medical home,” or a usual source of care. Patients who lack a medical home do not have easy access to timely, well organized health care. The Ibero-American Action League, Inc. created a Promotores de Salud (“Health Promoters”) program that encourages better use and understanding of the health care system among Latinos in the greater Rochester area. It reaches out to individuals in need of health care services and connects them to a “medical home” and to insurance resources. It also provides educational workshops and transportation, interpretation/translation, and patient navigation services for area Latinos with targeted health conditions (allergy, asthma, diabetes, heart disease, lead poisoning, mental health, obesity).

  • The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government Reforming the Small-Group Insurance Market, Phase 2 Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $195,261

    In the second of two grants from the New York State Health Foundation’s Coverage Consortium initiative, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government implemented Phase 2 of a project that focused on reform options for New York’s small-group insurance market . This project built on the knowledge base developed in the first grant phase, with specific analyses focused on insurance product standardization, advantages and disadvantages of high-risk pools, and sustainable methods for financing coverage expansions.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth Coverage Consortium that funded 10 grants to seven universities, policy institutes, and community agencies across the State, supporting projects that could inform State health reform efforts, offer ways to streamline enrollment in public programs, significantly reduce costs and improve quality, and test ideas for expanding coverage among small employers, sole proprietors, and self-employed people.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this consortium.

    Read about the first of two grants to the Rockefeller Institute from the NYSHealth Coverage Consortium initiative.

  • Working Today, Inc. - Freelancers Union Independent Workers Employment Benefits System Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $500,000

    An increasing number of American workers are employed in nontraditional arrangements as freelancers, independent contractors, or temporary workers. These workers do not receive the work benefits customarily offered by employers, including health insurance. Most earn too much to qualify for public programs, but cannot afford the expensive premiums charged in individually purchased plans. With NYSHealth’s support, Freelancers Union launched the Freelancers Insurance Company to make affordable health insurance available to New York City’s independent workers and also created a discount network with mental health providers, Freelancers Union Health Partners, in New York City. This initiative has shown that with collaboration, it’s possible for a nonprofit organization to launch an insurance company.

  • NYSHealth Authorization Medicaid Reform in New York State: Supporting Analyses to Expand, Simplify and Reform the System Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $716,848

    New York State’s $46 billion Medicaid system remains the top target for reform in the State’s health system. This authorization supported grants to study options for reforming Medicaid.

  • United Hospital Fund of New York Promoting the Expansion of Health Insurance in New York State Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $776,725

    Approximately 2.5 million New Yorkers lacked health insurance in 2007, according to estimates from the United Hospital Fund of New York. Public and private programs exist to increase coverage, but policymakers face several challenges in expanding coverage through these programs, including how to enroll and retain people in public programs, how to create options for low-wage workers, and how to enroll higher income people who go without coverage. In the first of two grants from the New York State Health Foundation’s Coverage Consortium initiative, the United Hospital Fund analyzed a multi-staged action plan to promote the expansion of insurance in New York State. It also examined the private insurance market in New York through an objective analysis of the health care market and health care organizations, including self-funded arrangements, and reviewed relevant insurance laws and regulations.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth Coverage Consortium that funded 10 grants to seven universities, policy institutes, and community agencies across the State, supporting projects that could inform State health reform efforts, offer ways to streamline enrollment in public programs, significantly reduce costs and improve quality, and test ideas for expanding coverage among small employers, sole proprietors, and self-employed people.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this consortium.

    Read about the second of two grants to the United Hospital Fund from the NYSHealth Coverage Consortium initiative.

  • The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government Reforming New York's Small Group Insurance Market: An Assessment of State Policies Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $312,806

    As the number of uninsured has increased and employer-based coverage has declined, policymakers have begun to focus their attention on the small group market. This focus suggests the need for closer analytical assessment of State activities aimed at improving cost and accessibility in the small group market. In the first of two grants from the New York State Health Foundation’s Coverage Consortium initiative, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government conducted an in-depth analysis and investigation of the applicability of various initiatives and policy options for New York State.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth Coverage Consortium that funded 10 grants to seven universities, policy institutes, and community agencies across the State, supporting projects that could inform State health reform efforts, offer ways to streamline enrollment in public programs, significantly reduce costs and improve quality, and test ideas for expanding coverage among small employers, sole proprietors, and self-employed people.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this consortium.

    Read about the second of two grants to the Rockefeller Institute from the NYSHealth Coverage Consortium initiative.

Showing 711-720 of 750 results