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  • Columbia University - Mailman School of Public Health Improving the Analysis of Health Insurance Expansion Options for New York State Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $181,073

    Approximately 2.5 million New Yorkers lacked health insurance in 2007, according to estimates from the United Hospital Fund, a New York health policy center. Proposals for increasing coverage had been offered, but needed to be analyzed for their responsiveness to New York’s health care system, their costs and consequences, and their acceptance by the public. The staff at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health examined the unique features of health care delivery in New York State and developed alternative strategies for expanding coverage--drawing heavily on public input--so that lawmakers can choose from a comprehensive menu of choices.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth Coverage Consortium that funded 10 grants to seven universities, policy institutes, and community agencies across the State, supporting projects that could inform State health reform efforts, offer ways to streamline enrollment in public programs, significantly reduce costs and improve quality, and test ideas for expanding coverage among small employers, sole proprietors, and self-employed people.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this consortium.

  • The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government Increasing Health Care Policy Research and Analysis Capability in New York State Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $129,157

    Medicaid is the single largest funding source for long-term care, paying for half of all nursing home and community based long-term care in the nation. Given the disproportionate use of Medicaid as a funding source for long-term care, the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Health Insurance Programs was looking for potential policy improvements to better target Medicaid spending and services. In addition, many states are looking for ways to reduce asset transfers as a means for reducing long-term care costs. Under this grant, New York State Health Policy Research Center at the Rockefeller Institute of Government (Rockefeller) undertook two studies. The first study compared New York State to other states on a range of long-term care issues. The second study reviewed the prevalence of denials for Medicaid-funded nursing home care and found wide variation in reported denial rates across the State’s counties. Both reports resulted in widespread press coverage across the State.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth authorization that funded a series of quick-strike analyses to help the New York State Department of Health’s (NYSDOH’s) Office of Health Insurance Programs find ways to streamline and expand its public health insurance programs.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this authorization.

    Read Medicaid and Long-Term Care: New York Compared to 18 Other States, a Rockefeller-produced report about how New York compares with other states on a range of long-term care issues, such as demographics, spending, and quality.

    Read Assessing Asset Transfer for Medicaid Eligibility in New York State, a Rockefeller-produced report about the incidence of asset transfers for Medicaid-funded long-term care.

    Read additional analyses NYSHealth funded Rockefeller to conduct based on its findings on rates of asset transfers.

    One important lesson emerged from this project regarding data extractions. Although the data necessary for this project were collected for administrative purposes, they were difficult to use for research. One way to address this shortcoming is to fund upfront work to see if the desired analysis is possible and whether the limitations present too much of a barrier to make a larger study worthwhile. Read about how this issue has come up on another NYSHealth grant to date.

  • Health Association of Niagara County Changing Children’s Lives by Transforming School System Policies Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $150,000

    Recognizing that obesity in youth has lifelong negative effects, including increasing the likelihood of developing serious chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, this project sought to reduce obesity rates for Niagara-area children by identifying and recommending new school system policies and other environmental changes to promote healthy eating and increase physical activity.

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