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  • Institute for Family Health The New York State Diabetes Campaign Priority Area: Diabetes Prevention and Management $593,371

    The Institute for Family Health is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality and availability of family practice services to medically underserved populations. The Institute worked with the leadership of NYSHealth to establish and lead the New York State Diabetes Campaign. The Campaign focused on reversing the diabetes epidemic in New York State by improving primary care for patients with diabetes, mobilizing community assets, and promoting public and private policies.

  • Center for Children and Families, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Eligibility Simplification Project for New York State Department of Health Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $50,000

    Although New York State has a relatively broad set of health insurance coverage options available to its residents below certain income levels, the public has trouble understanding their eligibility for these programs. Additionally, health care providers, State and county staff, and other stakeholders often have difficulty navigating who is eligible for what. To address this issue, the New York State Department of Health's Office of Health Insurance Programs (OHIP) asked NYSHealth to engage the Center for Children and Families (CCF) at Georgetown University’s Health Policy Institute to determine which changes to State law would be possible under Federal law to simplify coverage options and improve program participation rates. CCF then conducted a study to review the New York State Medicaid program’s multiple and overlapping eligibility categories and recommended options for OHIP to collapse and simplify those categories.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth authorization that funded a series of quick-strike analyses to help the New York State Department of Health’s (NYSDOH’s) Office of Health Insurance Programs find ways to streamline and expand its public health insurance programs.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this authorization.

  • Manatt Health Solutions Streamlining Medicaid Spend Down Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $48,204

    The Medicaid Excess Income program is an optional Federal program that allows individuals with large or ongoing medical expenses access to Medicaid coverage, even though their household income is too high to meet the regular Medicaid income eligibility standards. Individuals “spend down” by paying in or incurring medical expenses that equal or exceed the difference between their monthly income and the Medicaid eligibility level. However, Local Departments of Social Service (Local Districts) responsible for gathering health care receipts and payments and tracking these enrollees’ continued eligibility are struggling to manage the eligibility of Medicaid recipients enrolled in the Excess Income program. Under this grant, Manatt Health Solutions (Manatt) analyzed the Excess Income Program in New York State, and identified ways to improve the administrative efficiency and programmatic implementation of its enrollment and eligibility processes. The results of this report galvanized the consumer advocacy community to use the report as leverage to push for reforms of the Excess Income program.

    This project was part of a larger NYSHealth authorization that funded a series of quick-strike analyses to help the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Health Insurance Programs find ways to streamline and expand its public health insurance programs.

    Read an NYSHealth special report that contains a summary of findings from this authorization.

    Read Streamlining New York’s Medicaid Excess Income Program, a public report produced by Manatt about the Excess Income program, complete with a description of the program, characteristics and health care needs of enrollees, and options for streamlining the program.

    One of the reports’ recommendations, which the New York State Department of Health’s Office of Health Insurance Programs has implemented, is the establishment of a new Statewide Enrollment Center for Medicaid to centralize and streamline enrollment and renewal tasks across its public health insurance programs.

  • Hudson Headwaters Health Network Collaborative Case Management to Reduce Hospital Readmissions Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $49,170

    Hospital readmissions are costly to the health care system and too often traumatizing to patients and their families—a sign of ineffective and fractured health care service delivery. The readmission rate for hospitals in the Glens Falls metropolitan area is 18.5%—a full 6% higher than the statewide average. A planning grant to Hudson Headwaters helped them and their partner organizations, Glens Falls Hospital, and Warren and Washington County Home Health Service Agencies, assess the problem and develop an intervention that addresses the problem.

  • Foundation for Long Term Care Efficient and Cost-Effective Care Planning Priority Area: Expanding Health Care Coverage $354,958

    New York State required that a care plan be written at least four times a year for every nursing home resident. While these plans are important documents intended to manage individual nursing home residents’ health, existing care plan processes are inefficient, lengthy, and repetitive. This grant to the Foundation for Long Term Care supported development of a new, more efficient care planning process.

  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center The Intensive Wellness Program: A Health and Mental Health Intervention for High Cost Patients Priority Area: Advancing Primary Care $340,631

    Patients with repetitive hospitalizations frequently suffer from comorbid conditions including psychiatric illness, substance use issues, and multiple chronic illnesses. In the Bronx, these patients also face challenges related to poverty, illiteracy, housing instability, and abusive relationships. These high-need patients account for almost 80% of Medicaid spending. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center (MLK), together with the Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, implemented an Intensive Wellness Program, which shifted high-cost inpatient services into comprehensive primary care to lower costs and improve health outcomes.

  • Health Ministry of the Southern Tier Expanded Medical and Dental Services for Uninsured Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $75,148

    According to the U.S. Census, 22,352 residents of the three counties served by Health Ministry of the Southern Tier (HMST) are uninsured. Steuben County is a rural area with three primary population centers: Corning, Bath, and Hornell. The Western region of Steuben County, Hornell, is a relatively poor community that remains underserved by HMST. To address this part of Steuben County, the United Way of the Southern Tier (United Way) and Excellus BlueCross Blue Shield of Central New York (Excellus) requested that HMST establish a fifth center in Hornell to provide free medical and dental care to people with incomes below 200% of the Federal poverty level.

  • Center for Excellence in Aging Services/Research Foundation of SUNY Cost Effective Delivery of an Active Choices Health Promotion Program Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $124,512

    The Active Choices program is a telephone-assisted counseling program developed by the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been found to increase physical activity among older adults (ages 50 years and older). Under the project, “Cost-effective Delivery of an Active Choices Health Promotion Program,” the Center for Excellence in Aging Services (the Center) at the Research Foundation of the State University of Albany implemented a volunteer-led Active Choices program for seniors in four New York State communities.

  • Westfield Memorial Hospital Amish Midwifery Care Program Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $114,000

    The Amish communities of Northwestern Chautauqua County deliver approximately 65–80 babies per year with no professional assistance. Prenatal care, including routine tests and examinations to predict potential complications, are not available in the area. According to Amish customs and beliefs, women do not seek prenatal care during, or after, their pregnancy. As a result, the number of unanticipated complications at birth is greatly increased among this population. With NYSHealth’s support, Westfield Memorial Hospital improved access to prenatal and postnatal care for these Amish families by providing a comprehensive ambulatory midwifery care program for mothers and babies—in the home or in a local clinic—therefore making the site of health care more accessible and culturally appropriate.

  • The Transition Network A Healthcare Collaborative: Grassroots Caring Communities Connecting with Health Providers Priority Area: Special Projects Fund $144,325

    In 2011, the first of America’s 80 million baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) turned 65. As the population ages, the country faces a dwindling supply of professional caregivers; weakened family ties; and an increasingly fragmented health care system that undermines availability of, access to, and quality of care. Community and voluntary associations, with their shared space, common interests, values, and traditions, are an overlooked resource. Strengthening these communities to better help their own constituents is consistent with a national interest in service and community building, innovation, and more efficient delivery of health care. To meet the growing needs of this community, the New York State Health Foundation awarded The Transition Network (TTN) a grant to build a Caring Collaborative, a model that teaches members how to work to preserve and promote healthy independence both for themselves and for all TTN members.

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